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Research & Development

NIST Therapy for Ultraviolet Laser Beams: Hydrogen-treated Fibers

Micrograph of an optical fiber that has been infused with hydrogen and cured with ultraviolet light (here shown transmitting violet laser light.) Fibers treated this way can transmit stable, high-power ultraviolet laser light for long periods of time, resisting the damage usually caused by UV light. The diameter of the pattern of air holes surrounding the core is 62.5 micrometers


Research & Development

Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using Earth's magnetic field

Earth's magnetic field, a familiar directional indicator over long distances, is routinely probed in applications ranging from geology to archaeology. Now it has provided the basis for a technique which might, one day, be used to characterize the chemical composition of fluid mixtures in their native environments. Researchers have carried out nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using an ultra-low magnetic field comparable to Earth's magnetic field


Research & Development

Spacewalking cosmonauts launch satellite, set up studies

Russian cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev attends a news conference behind a glass wall at Baikonur cosmodrome March 24, 2014


Research & Development

Microchip reveals how tumor cells transition to invasion

A microscopic obstacle course of carefully spaced pillars enables researchers to observe cancer cells directly as they break away from a tumor mass and move more rapidly across the microchip. The device could be useful for testing cancer drugs and further research on the mechanics of metastasis


Research & Development

3-D Printing Builds Up Architecture

In May 2014, a private company in China, WinSun, printed 10 full-size houses using 3-D printers in the space of a day. The process utilized quick-drying cement and construction water to build the walls layer-by-layer.


Research & Development

Flexible tapes from the nanoworld

Dr. Wilhelm Auwärter and his team are working on a research project to develop tiny flat molecule tapes at the Department of Physics of Technische Universität München (TUM). These structures could find versatile applications. Via direct coupling on a silver surface, the scientists successfully formed dimers and short chains of porphine molecules without contaminating by-products.


Research & Development

New brain-based marker of stress susceptibility

Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it’s not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond.


Research & Development

Wearable device for early detection of common diabetes-related neurological condition

Thanks to a small, wearable device that can hang on a pair of eyeglasses, a common complication of diabetes may get caught sooner. Researchers have developed a pupillometer that scans the patient's eyes for early signs of diabetic autonomic neuropathy -- a condition that progressively affects the autonomic nerves controlling vital organs. This kind of early detection enables early treatment, leading to far better health outcomes for the patient.


Research & Development

Enhanced instrument enables high-speed chemical imaging of tissues

A research team has demonstrated a dramatically improved technique for analyzing biological cells and tissues based on characteristic molecular vibrations. The new technique is an advanced form of Raman spectroscopy that is fast and accurate enough to create high-resolution images of biological specimens, with detailed spatial information on specific biomolecules, at speeds fast enough to observe changes in living cells.


Research & Development

Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity

Researchers have created a plasmon laser detector that can sniff out tiny traces of airborne molecules of explosives. The sensor detected both DNT and ammonium nitrate at concentrations below one part per billion.


Research & Development

MIT scientists develop sensor-operated robotic fingers

The extra fingers move in sync with the wearer's hand, the developers said.


Research & Development

Drones could provide perfect lighting for photography

Lighting is crucial to the art of photography. But lights are cumbersome and time-consuming to set up, and outside the studio, it can be prohibitively difficult to position them where, ideally, they ought to go.


Research & Development

Speeding up data storage by a thousand times with “spin current”

The storage capacity of hard drives is increasing explosively, but the speed with which all that data can be written has reached its limits. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and the FOM Foundation present a promising new technology which potentially allows data to be stored 1,000 times as fast in Nature Communications. The technology, in which ultra-short laser pulses generate a "spin current", also opens the way to future optical computer chips.

Research & Development

New technology offers precise control of molecular self-assembly

A research group led by Dr. Takashi Nakanishi, a MANA independent scientist, and Dr. Martin J. Hollamby, ICYS researcher (currently a lecturer at Keele University in the United Kingdom), at the National Institute for Materials Science, has developed a new technology that can easily and precisely control the timing of and the structure as well as functions obtained in self-assembly of π-conjugated molecules, which is a key technology in the field of organic electronics materials.


DARPA taps Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memory

The Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory, DARPA officials announced this week.


Making quantum connections: The speed of information in a spin network

Physicists are pretty adept at controlling quantum systems and even making certain entangled states. Researchers are putting these skills to work to explore the dynamics of correlated quantum systems. Recent results investigated how information flows through a quantum many-body system.


Using sand to improve battery performance

Researchers have developed a lithium ion battery made of sand that outperforms the current standard by three times.


Nasa equips space robots with smartphones

Nasa plans to send Google's 3D smartphones into space to function as the "eyes and brains" of free-flying robots inside the Space Station.


Highly reactive gold carbene complex shines in emerald green

With a chemical “trick”, scientists at Heidelberg University have succeeded in isolating a stable gold carbene complex.


Self-healing ‘transformer’ drones – future of warfare?

Future aircraft should be able to heal themselves in flight, include 3D printers that could produce mini-drones during a mission, and even use a ‘transformer’ technology, believes BAE Systems claiming all of this could become a reality by 2040.


Muscle-powered bio-bots walk on command

Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated a class of walking “bio-bots” powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function. The group published its work in the online early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.


New NIST metamaterial gives light a one-way ticket

The light-warping structures known as metamaterials have a new trick in their ever-expanding repertoire. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a silver, glass and chromium nanostructure that can all but stop visible light cold in one direction while giving it a pass in the other.* The device could someday play a role in optical information processing and in novel biosensing devices.


Inspired by nature, researchers create tougher metal materials

Drawing inspiration from the structure of bones and bamboo, researchers have found that by gradually changing the internal structure of metals they can make stronger, tougher materials that can be customized for a wide variety of applications—from body armor to automobile parts.


Behind a marine creature’s bright green fluorescent glow

Pushing closer to understanding the mechanisms behind the mysterious glow of light produced naturally by certain animals, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have deciphered the structural components related to fluorescence brightness in a primitive sea creature.


Non-invasive advanced image analysis could lead to better patient care

Lung cancer patients could receive more precise treatment, and their progress could be better tracked, using a new high-tech method of non-invasive medical imaging analysis, according to a study published by the journal PLOS ONE.


New approach for tuberculosis drugs

Consumption was one of the worst known diseases of the 18th century. Thanks to medical advances, the number of deaths from this lung disease—which is today known as tuberculosis—has declined significantly. Efforts to eradicate the disease in the 1950s and 1960s resulted in a wide range of new drugs entering the market.


Japanese gold leaf artists worked on the nanoscale

Ancient Japanese gold leaf artists were truly masters of their craft. An analysis of six ancient Namban paper screens show that these artifacts are gilded with gold leaf that was hand-beaten to the nanometer scale. Study leader Sofia Pessanha of the Atomic Physics Center of the University of Lisbon in Portugal believes that the x-ray fluorescence technique her team used in the analysis could also be used to date other artworks without causing any damage to them. The results are published in Springer’s journal Applied Physics A: Material Science and Processing.


Squid sucker ring teeth material could have many uses

Squid tentacles are loaded with hundreds of suction cups, or suckers, and each sucker has a ring of razor-sharp “teeth” that help these mighty predators latch onto and take down prey. In a study published in the journal ACS Nano, researchers report that the proteins in these teeth could form the basis for a new generation of strong, but malleable, materials that could someday be used for reconstructive surgery, eco-friendly packaging and many other applications.


Making graphene from plastic?

Graphene is gaining heated attention, dubbed a “wonder material” with great conductivity, flexibility and durability. However, graphene is hard to come by due to the fact that its manufacturing process is complicated and mass production not possible.


Research could lead to dramatic data farm energy savings

Washington State University has developed a wireless network on a computer chip that could reduce energy consumption at huge data farms by as much as 20%.